HCI Research Group Seminars

News about seminars (and other activities of the HCI Group) is distributed via the york-hci mailing list. This is maintained by Jisc - and you may subscribe yourself to the list.

Seminars usually take place on Thursdays, 13.30-14.30 in CSE/082 – unless otherwise specified.

Information for speakers is available.



Spring Term 2017

Date Speaker Room Title
(Links to abstract)
12 January Anna Bramwell-Dicks CSE/082 Music while you work: The effect of music on transcription typing performance and experience
19 January Yannis Darzentas
(Visiting Leverhume professor)
CSE/082 Systems Thinking in HCI and Design
Monday 23January Judy Edworthy
Plymouth University
RCH/Lakehouse Alarm design and implementation in complex and safety-critical domains
2 February Nervo Verdezoto
University of Leicester
CSE/082 Understanding and Designing Technology to Fit People’s Everyday Practices: Challenges and Opportunities in Healthcare and Sustainability
9 February Alistair Edwards CSE/082 Clickbait – post-truth?
16 February Sally Quinn
(Department of Psychology)
CSE/082 Do facial judgments predict the re-tweeting of images of missing and wanted people on Twitter?
23 February Sam Simpson CSE/082 Postponed to 20 April
How do experienced mindfulness practitioners develop a mindful life and what does this tell us about playing computer games mindfully?
Friday 3 March 11.30-12.30 Stuart Lawler
National Council of the Blind of Ireland
RCH/248X Postponed Demonstration of screereading software
9 March Ned Potter
(Library)
CSE/082 Explorations in UX: ethnography and design at the University of York library
16 March Heather O'Brien
University of British Columbia
CSE/082 User engagement and learning in digital information environments: Complementary or contradictory processes?

Abstracts

12 January
Anna Bramwell-Dicks: Music while you work: The effect of music on transcription typing performance and experience

Exposure to music is a frequent part of our everyday lives and there is a wealth of empirical evidence that music affects people's behaviour and experiences. However, despite the evidence that music can affect people, theories for why and how music affects people are lacking. More research is needed in different contexts to help us to understand why music is such an affective medium. In particular, there is a need to extend the research beyond manipulating just tempo and volume of the music to understand the effect of more dimensions of music on behaviour and experience.

During my PhD, I investigated how music affects people when typing - a mundane, work-related computing task. In this seminar I will present a number of experiments looking at how different dimensions of music (including presence of vocals, style, genre, volume, tempo and time signature) affect transcription typing performance and experience.

19 January
Yannis Darzentas: Systems Thinking in HCI and Design

In HCI we are dealing with human-centric problems that are, in their majority, complex and wicked. As a result, such problems are difficult to understand and deal with. The robustness of the suggested ways of tackling these problems depends on capturing as much of the relevant Design Space as possible. Systems Thinking is, among other approaches, one that claims to aid the efforts to capture and understand the design problem space and describe in an operational way the possible tackling of it. Definitions, properties, and possible applications of Systems Thinking to HCI and Design, will be presented with examples.

Monday 23 January
Judy Edworthy: Alarm design and implementation in complex and safety-critical domains

Alarm sounds are still ubiquitous in almost every work domain, and in some environments their use is so prolific that the term 'alarm fatigue' is used to describe over-exposure and noncompliance with alarms, particularly in the clinical environment. Part of the 'alarm problem' centres around the alarm sounds themselves, and in this talk I will focus on recent work that I have carried out with collaborators in Europe and in the US working towards improving the design of audible alarms. I will demonstrate how improvements in audible alarm design can have a broad impact on work practice. I will focus on two areas: the design of alarms for the European Space Agency control centre at Darmstadt, Germany, and current work on updating clinical alarms intended to support a global medical device standard.

9 February
Alistair Edwards: Clickbait – post-truth?

In a previous seminar I explored the phenomenon of clickbait. I wish to return to the topic because of two developments since then. One is that I supervised (Eason) Yiteng Xing's project on this topic and found out more about it. Secondly we seem to have entered an age which some are referring to as post truth.

I will discuss some of Eason's results, which were not always in line with expectations. Something else that arose from Eason's project was (as so often) a realization as to things that we do not know. Particularly, while there are definitions of clickbait, it is not always easy to apply them. If we are in a post-truth era, companies such as Facebook are pledging to implement technological solutions, and yet it seems that the subtle boundaries being tested may not lend themselved to such approaches.

Warning One of the techniques used by clickbait designers is to catch people's attention by displaying shocking or provocative material. Some of this may be displayed in this seminar.

2 February
Nervo Verdezoto: Understanding and Designing Technology to Fit People's Everyday Practices: Challenges and Opportunities in Healthcare and Sustainability

There is a growing desire to address societal challenges in healthcare and sustainability through the use of information technology such as medication reminders and smart electricity meters. Although these technologies have managed to raise awareness regarding people’s care activities or energy consumption, most of these technologies have failed to consider how people actually use and integrate these devices into their everyday practices. As a result, people still find it difficult to adopt and embrace these technologies to improve their health or save energy. For example, an older adult with an active lifestyle might frequently be outside the home (e.g., at work, restaurant or any other social setting) when they are supposed to take their blood pressure or medication, challenging their care activities in relation to their everyday practices. Taking a practice-based research approach, this talk presents the challenges and opportunities for designing a new generation of information technologies (e.g., self-care technology, eco-feedback technology, etc.) that can better fit into people’s everyday practices. These points are presented using several case studies in healthcare and sustainability e.g., investigating the older adults medication management practices as well as the practices of residents of a sensor-equipped student dormitory targeted to motivate them to reduce and shift their energy consumption.

Biography

Nervo Xavier Verdezoto is an Assistant Professor/Lecturer in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) at the Department of Informatics, University of Leicester. He is a member of the Interaction Design and Evaluation of Socio-technical Systems (IDEAS) Group. Previously, he was a postdoctoral researcher at the Ubiquitous Computing and Interaction Group at the Department of Computer Science, Aarhus University in Denmark. He also was research assistant at the Centre for Pervasive Healthcare at Aarhus University during his PhD studies. His work combines fieldwork with user-centered and participatory design methods to further understand people’s everyday practices, different stakeholder’s needs, and how people appropriate technology. In particular, he has been working in various research projects related to healthcare, physical computing, and sustainable HCI.

16 February
Sally Quinn: Do facial judgments predict the re-tweeting of images of missing and wanted people on Twitter?

In recent years, Twitter has become a powerful medium used by the Police to ask for the public’s help in tracking down missing and wanted individuals. The Police often post images of these people as part of their appeal and the public can retweet (share) these images in a bid to help the police find these people. First impressions from the face often bias our behaviour towards unknown others (e.g. Airbnb hosts who look more trustworthy get more customers and can charge more). In this talk, I present a series of studies which examine the relationships between first impressions from faces and how these relate to the number of retweets the images of wanted and missing people received. These studies open up discussion of whether there are optimal photos that the police can select to maximise sharing on social media.

3 March
Stuart Lawler: Demonstration of screereading software

Postponed to next term.

Stuart will talk about his use of technology as a blind person, and give demonstrations of some of the technology he uses. He is very happy to discuss anything to do with visual impairment and technology.

9 March
Ned Potter: Explorations in UX: ethnography and design at the University of York library

Over the last two years the University Library has started to use various ethnographic techniques to better understand our users. These include behavioural mapping, cognitive mapping, touchstone tours, unstructured interviews and even love / break-up letters. As a result we've learned more about the staff and students involved than we've ever learned about any group of users before.

This presentation will cover how we've approached the three major UX projects we've undertaken so far, explore the results and the changes we've made to our systems as a result of UX, and ask the room for their own views and expertise about how we're using UX, what we should change and how we should move forward.

Ned Potter is an Academic Liaison Librarian and has played a leading role in the UX work at the library, as well as co-organising the international User Experience in Libraries Conference.

16 March
Heather O'Brien: User engagement and learning in digital information environments: Complementary or contradictory processes?

Biography

Heather O'Brien is an Associate Professor at the iSchool, University of British Columbia, where she teaches and researches in the area of human information interaction. Dr. O'Brien is best known for her work in the area of user engagement with technology, where she has contributed numerous publications, including two recent books, Why Engagement Matters: Cross-Disciplinary Perspectives and Innovations on User Engagement with Digital Media (edited with Paul Cairns, 2016) and Measuring User Engagement (authored with Mounia Lalmas and Elad Yom-Tov, 2014), as well as the User Engagement Scale (UES), an experiential questionnaire that is used internationally to understand digitally mediated user experiences.


Summer Term 2017

Date Speaker Room Title
(Links to abstract)
20 April Sam Simpson CSE/082 How do experienced mindfulness practitioners develop a mindful life and what does this tell us about playing computer games mindfully?
27 April CSE/082
4 May CSE/082
11 May CSE/082
18 May Tobias Mülling
University of Brighton
CSE/082 Embracing the Gesture-Driven Interface: challenges for the design of graphical mid-air interfaces using a gestural approach
25 May Andrew Lewis CSE/082 Introduction to the Mobile ESM application (provisional title)
1 June CSE/082
8 June CSE/082
15 June John Mateer
TFTV
CSE/082 Directing for Cinematic Virtual Reality: the relationship between 'presence', 'transportation' and 'suspension of disbelief'
22 June   CSE/082  

20 April
Sam Simpson: How do experienced mindfulness practitioners develop a mindful life and what does this tell us about playing computer games mindfully?

Mindfulness is the key aspect of the game/app being developed in my EngD work. This talk describes a study to look at how experienced neuro-typical mindfulness practitioners develop the habit of mindfulness in their daily lives. It uses the results to think about the implications for using games to develop mindfulness in a clinical population and whether mindful gaming can be a thing.

18 May
Tobias Mülling: Embracing the Gesture-Driven Interface: challenges for the design of graphical mid-air interfaces using a gestural approach

Mid-air interaction has been investigated for many years, and with the launch of affordable sensors such as Microsoft Kinect (Microsoft Corporation), Leap Motion (Leap Motion, Inc.) and Myo Armband (Thalmic Labs Inc.), this type of interaction has become more popular. However, graphical interfaces for mid-air interaction have been designed using two dominant styles: cursor-based, where the user's hand replicates the mouse movement by copying the WIMP interaction pattern (Windows, Icons, Menus, and Pointing), and gesture-library, where different gestures are assigned to the functionalities of a system, generating a cognitive overload due to the need for recall over recognition. The use of a gestural approach based on manipulation presents itself as an alternative to the mentioned interaction styles, with a focus on enhancing the user experience in 2D Design Patterns. Taking a practice-based research approach, this talk presents the design space of a gestural approach based on manipulation, with challenges and strategies that can be used in the design of graphical interfaces for mid-air interaction. A series of experiments will be presented to exemplify the use of visual elements and mid-air gestures, in an attempt to create gesture-driven interfaces with a satisfactory user experience.

15 June
John Mateer: Directing for Cinematic Virtual Reality: the relationship between 'presence', 'transportation' and 'suspension of disbelief'

The emerging medium of 'Cinematic Virtual Reality' (CVR) features media fidelity that approaches what is found in feature film. Unlike traditional VR, CVR limits the level of control users have within the environment to choosing viewpoints rather than interacting with the world itself. This means that CVR production arguably represents a new type of filmmaking. 'Suspension of disbelief' represents the level of immersion audiences experience when watching a film. Likewise, 'presence' refers to a similar experiential measure in Virtual Reality though it is considered slightly differently. This talk considers the use of 'transportation theory' as a bridge between these constructs to enable established film directing methods to be more readily transferred to Virtual Reality and, specifically, Cinematic VR production.

Archive of previous seminars


Links